Glossary

Deism

deism (n.) 1680s (deist is from 1620s), from French déisme, from Latin deus "god" (see Zeus).

 

Cited From: Online Etymology Dictionary

Democracy

(n.) 1570s, from Middle French démocratie (14c.), from Medieval Latin democratia (13c.), from Greek demokratia "popular government," from demos "common people," originally "district" (see demotic), + kratos "rule, strength" (see -cracy).

Democracy implies that the man must take the responsibility for choosing his rulers and representatives, and for the maintenance of his own 'rights' against the possible and probable encroachments of the government which he has sanctioned to act for him in public matters. [Ezra Pound, "ABC of Economics," 1933]

 

Cited From: Online Etymology Dictionary

 

Democracy is where the majority make slaves out of the minority

 

Cited From: Jeffrey Hann

Democrat

(n.) 1790, "adherent of democracy," with reference to France, from French démocrate (18c., opposed to aristocrate), back-formation from démocratie (see democracy); revived in U.S. as a political party affiliation 1798, with a capital D. As a shortening of this, Demo (1793) is older than Dem (c. 1840).

Cited From: Online Etymology Dictionary

Demotic

1822, from Greek demotikos "of or for the common people, in common use," from demos "common people," originally "district," from PIE *da-mo- "division," from root *da- "to divide" (see tide).

 

Cited From: Online Etymology Dictionary

Doom

(n.) Old English dom "law, judgment, condemnation."

 

Cited From: Online Etymology Dictionary